Robin Hood – Man or Myth

  Being Nottingham, born and bred I felt it was time to dispel a few of the tales surrounding our local hero. I have no idea what bought this on, probably yet another re-run of the abysmal Kevin Costner version whose only saving grace were the wonderful performances of the late Alan Rickman and Geraldine McEwan. but I digress, first an explanation.

The statement I am about to make gives me an even chance of getting lynched the next time I venture in to the City Centre. The man believed to be Robin was a Wolfshead or Outlaw, Outlaws were also known as hooded men. Maybe he started life as Robin of the Hood or Robin, the Hooded man as one version puts it. Maybe this as even passed down to the present day ‘Hoodies’.

I find it hard to believe that one man, even with accomplices, i.e. The Merry Men could have operated in several counties over a period of roughly four hundred years. I believe that there were many Robins, in different times and different counties. Yorkshire has some very strong Robin Hood connections too.

I have an idea that the Robin Hood Legend probably came about around the same time as the Morte De Arthur, which immortalised King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. It might be a little unusual but why not cast an outlaw in the heroic mould, after all it was all about selling romantic ideals about our country.

We all like to think of the underdog as a hero, but in Norman England that would be highly unlikely. Norman justice was swift and sure, I don’t imagine anyone trying to undermine them would have lasted very long. But this is only one man’s opinion, we each have out own beliefs and I wouldn’t try to contradict your own in any way.

12 thoughts on “

  1. Unless of course Robin Hood and his Merry Men were Merry Vampires.

    Which might explain how they lived for 400 years.

    Interestingly enough, I once had an English Lit professor who was convinced that the Robin Hood myth actually dated back to the Green Man Myth of Osiris in Ancient Egypt.

    I meant to ask him to elaborate on that but I never did.

    Of course my dad and I used to live in the hamlet of Sherwood Park outside Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

    And of course Sherwood Park was named after Sherwood Forest.

    So you saw plenty of signs featuring Robin Hood around the town.

    The 1997 Medieval Days fest was the best Medieval Days fest Sherwood Park put on.

    My dad was made one of the 12 Knights of the Round Table that year (they had never worked an Arthurian theme into the festival previously).

    They also brought over for the festival that year the real Sheriff of Nottingham from England.

    I don’t remember the man’s name but he was a 6 foot 6 Jamaican.

    So if you ever remember a Sheriff of Nottingham who was a 6 foot 6 Jamaican, my dad and I met him.

    Like

    1. I apologise for the delay, I’ve just discovered several of your comments. I agree that the Costner film is not the worst but some of the elements in it were so unbelievable like England being invaded by the Picts – unbelievable.

      Liked by 1 person

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